Popular app ruins self-esteem

Photo courtesy of gameskinny.com Creator of Flappy Bird, Dong Nguyen, launched the application for the iPhone in May 2013. It took Nguyen only two days to create the game.
Photo courtesy of gameskinny.com Creator of Flappy Bird, Dong Nguyen, launched the application for the iPhone in May 2013. It took Nguyen only two days to create the game.

Photo courtesy of gameskinny.com
Creator of Flappy Bird, Dong Nguyen, launched the application for the iPhone in May 2013. It took Nguyen only two days to create the game.

It was a cold Jan. 27, another dreary Monday after classes curled up in bed when I made the worst decision of my short life.

Scrolling through Twitter, I saw an update on my timeline indicating Apple’s most downloaded app of the day. I decided to give it a try and see what the hype was all about.

The name of the game: Flappy Bird. The object: guide a small fish-looking bird through the air without so much as grazing the pipes that come from both the top and the bottom of the screen.

I downloaded the app and immediately began playing.

My first few attempts at the game were sad and seemingly hopeless. However, as a moderate gamer, I understood learning to maneuver this bird correctly might take a few tries.

I kept tapping away, each time almost making it through that first pipe, but not quite.

On my fourth or fifth attempt, I made it through the first pipe. I was so overjoyed, I almost forgot I had to keep going. Within a matter of seconds my flappy bird fell and I became instantly frustrated with myself.

What better thing was there to do on a Monday evening? I kept playing and the frustration of such a simple-minded game took over every sense in my body.

My roommate can attest to the profanity that echoed through the hallways of Elizabeth Residential College that evening. For those of you who need an example, it was reminiscent of a Lil Wayne song.

Even worse is that this escapade lasted close to two hours, drained my phone battery and my highest score remained at five. That’s all.

Shortly after, I deleted Flappy Bird because I realized it was ruining my self-esteem and the quality of life of those around me with my anger.

I am one of the few who got out in time, so I guess my bad decision could have been much worse.

In the end, Flappy Bird became a sensation and people were actually earning scores higher than five. I saw posts of screenshots on Facebook as high as 153.

Maybe I’m a little bitter, but my first thought was, “Where them cheat codes at?”

Anyways, the game is a rip off of Mario World with a difficulty level that tests your patience. It is amazing to me how Dong Nguyen, the creator, didn’t face copyright infringement charges.

Despite that, the game has been removed from the app store because the creator said it interferred with his “simple life.”

Whatever the reason, Flappy Bird may be gone, but it is definitely not forgotten just yet.

Those who downloaded the game before the app was pulled from the store are still able to play the game. Some people are even selling their phones for more than $90,000 on eBay. It gets worse. People are actually buying them.

I find this ridiculous, but like I said I am bitter. The game is challenging. It requires patience and determination.

Consider this a Public Service Announcement. Though the game may be gone for good, I encourage every person not to try Flappy Bird.

However, I should probably tell you the opposite. After all, the only reason I downloaded the game was because someone else told me it would be a bad idea.

Listen to the reviews. If you are already addicted, there is still hope. Check into Flappy Bird rehab now. Otherwise, enjoy the other games created after the Flappy Bird sensation such as Splashy Fish, Flappy Fish, Flappy Unicorn and Flappy Plane.

 

Story by Hunter Harrell, Features Editor