Morgan steps down as Provost

Story by Mary Bradley, Editor-in-Chief After five years in the office of Associate Provost and Provost, Jay Morgan will step down from his position effective June 30. In an email sent to the University, Morgan wrote that he will be returning to a tenured professor position in the Huston School of Agriculture …

Murray State Christ Ambassador, relief team aids in Nepal

Story by Zachary Orr, Assistant News Editor Two hours into his return to Kathmandu from a remote village in Nepal April 28, Ryan Brooks felt the ground shift beneath his four-wheel drive truck as a 7.2 magnitude earthquake shook the earth beneath him. He was experiencing the second largest earthquake …

Golf women excel in leadership

Story by Mallory Tucker, Staff writer Some leaders are loud, outspoken and enthusiastic. Some leaders are quiet, reserved and logical. All successful leaders must lead by example, which is exactly what juniors Abbi Stamper and Sophie Hillier plan to do when they return in the fall as captains of the 2015-16 …

OPERATION: GRADUATION

Story by Zachary Orr, Assistant News Editor In the fall of 2016, Murray State will offer its first University scholarship for veterans: Operation Graduation. The scholarship was made because of a growing demand for financial assistance that veterans have when pursuing higher education today, said Chris Jeter, assistant registrar for Veteran …

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Morgan steps down as Provost

Story by Mary Bradley, Editor-in-Chief

File photo

After five years in the office of Associate Provost and Provost, Jay Morgan will step down from his position effective June 30.

In an email sent to the University, Morgan wrote that he will be returning to a tenured professor position in the Huston School of Agriculture for the 2015-16 academic year. However, Morgan said he will be “on loan” to the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education, or CPE, as the new vice president of Academic Affairs effective July 1.

Morgan noted that he will not be formally leaving the University, but will be working with the state government in Frankfort, Ky., until he returns to the University. His appointment will be through an agreement between CPE and Murray State.

“I consider this CPE appointment as a good professional opportunity for me and also good for Murray State, but acknowledge that these statewide governmental appointments can be fast and furious and at some time I will return to the University to just have fun teaching and interacting with students,” Morgan wrote.

He said President Bob Davies will be working through details during this transition and will appoint an interim Provost.

Morgan was selected as Provost in 2013 from a pool of 84 candidates and was one of four finalists. A 17-member search committee chaired by Jack Rose included representatives from each academic college and school, constituent groups, the Dean’s Council, professional staff, Student Affairs and athletics selected Morgan.

Amidst Morgan stepping down as Provost, other areas of the University will see changes as well.

Ted Brown, dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts, will be stepping down from his position after 10 years effective August 8. Pending approval by the Board of Regents, Staci Stone will be the interim dean during 2015-16.

As the University moves forward, a national search for a new dean to begin July 1, 2016.

Additionally, Adam Murray, dean of University Libraries, has accepted a position at another university and will be replaced by acting dean Ashley Ireland.

 

Murray State Christ Ambassador, relief team aids in Nepal

Story by Zachary Orr, Assistant News Editor

People stand on rubble after the second earthquake to hit Nepal in two weeks. Photo courtesy of Ryan Brooks.

People stand on rubble after the second earthquake to hit Nepal in two weeks. Photo courtesy of Ryan Brooks.

Two hours into his return to Kathmandu from a remote village in Nepal April 28, Ryan Brooks felt the ground shift beneath his four-wheel drive truck as a 7.2 magnitude earthquake shook the earth beneath him.

He was experiencing the second largest earthquake to hit Nepal in the last three weeks. The first one, which registered 7.9 on the Richter scale, occurred April 25 and killed an estimated 8,500 people. The first earthquake inspired Brooks, lead missionary for Murray State’s Chi Alpha, to travel with a team for a two week relief project.

The quake Brooks was experiencing killed 48 more and left thousands injured. Brooks was on the side of a mountain four hours northeast of Kathmandu when it hit.

After experiencing dozens of tremors during his stay in Nepal, Brooks said he wasn’t scared for his life, but looking back he understands the danger of the situation he and his teammates were in.

“Maybe I should have been concerned for my safety,” he said.

Murray State alumna Liz Woods was a member of the relief team Brooks took part in. They, alongside members of the Evangel World Prayer Center in Louisville, Ky., spent the last two weeks aiding Nepalese citizens, trying to put their lives back together as much as possible.

Brooks said it was a surreal experience to see the devastation in person.

“The camera never cuts away when you’re here,” he said. “Those 8,500 people have faces and stories and families.”

The team spent most of its time in villages trying to provide personalized aid on an individual level, unlike the broad support provided by the larger relief agencies. Brooks said the team has spent days searching the wreckage to find people’s valued possessions and livestock.

Photo courtesy of Ryan Brooks

Photo courtesy of Ryan Brooks

Although the members of the team came to Nepal with the intent to give, the Nepalese people have welcomed them to their country as guests. He said the team has been invited into someone’s home, or what was left of it, for almost every meal.

“They had nothing before the earthquake,” Brooks said. “Post earthquake they are having us into their homes and giving us whatever food they have.”

Brooks said he encourages everyone to give what they can to relief efforts, but to be careful what organizations are taking the money. Brooks talked to many Nepalese citizens who fear any funds given to the Nepalese government will be misused.

Samaritan’s Purse and Convoy of Hope are two trustworthy organizations, he said.

More than any other aid, Brooks said the people of Nepal’s largest need is hope.

“When you stand on top of your home, and it’s just a pile of rock, it can be very easy to grieve,” he said. “You have to move out of grief and into hope for the future.”

Top sport shots of the season

May 1, 2015 Athletics
1.IMG_1585_EDIT After senior T.J. Sapp made three free throws, the Racers went into overtime against Southeast Missouri State on Feb. 2. The Racers pulled out a win 94-92 placing them at win 21 and clinching the OVC regular season title.

1
After senior T.J. Sapp made three free throws, the Racers went into overtime against Southeast Missouri State on Feb. 2. The Racers pulled out a win 94-92 placing them at win 21 and clinching the OVC regular season title.

 

… Continue Reading

Golf women excel in leadership

Story by Mallory TuckerStaff writer

Jenny Rohl/The News Junior golfer Abbi Stamper expresses that her motivation comes from watching other teams play.

Jenny Rohl/The News
Junior golfer Abbi Stamper expresses that her motivation comes from watching other teams play.

Some leaders are loud, outspoken and enthusiastic. Some leaders are quiet, reserved and logical.

All successful leaders must lead by example, which is exactly what juniors Abbi Stamper and Sophie Hillier plan to do when they return in the fall as captains of the 2015-16 women’s golf team.

“They are two completely different personalities, which is what you want in a captain,” said Head Coach Velvet Milkman. “You don’t want captains to be the same person. Different personalities gravitate toward different people. So yes, Abbi is the more outgoing one, the more bubbly one. She’s the one beforehand high-fiving and saying, ‘We got this.’ Sophie is the more reserved, but leads by example. You will not find anyone that works any harder than her. And people are very comfortable going and talking to her, as well.”

Over the summer, both women will play in various tournaments without the stress of balancing schoolwork. Hillier will return to Sandy, England and Stamper to Frankfort, Ky., where they will both try to improve their scores by two strokes, the goal Milkman assigned to both before beginning fall golf.

As an international student, Hillier believes playing collegiate golf will make her a better person going into the real world. In England, collegiate athletics are not commonplace, as university is the only focus for students. … Continue Reading

Five things to do in Murray over Summer Break:

May 1, 2015 Features

Story by Gisselle HernandezContributing writer

As the semester draws to a close, students eagerly prepare to leave for Summer Break but those who stay in Murray may find the town becomes much more quiet once the majority of students head out.

Despite Murray being relatively small, it has no shortage of entertainment students can engage in. The following are some activities that students can do over the summer in or near Murray.

Land Between the Lakes

Land Between the Lakes, commonly known as LBL, is a popular recreational area that is less an hour away from Murray on Van Morgan Drive. It offers numerous activities for all types of sightseers. There is camping available for $12 a night at the basic campsite, the Golden Pond Planetarium and Observatory for $5 and more than 500 miles of hiking and biking trails. Students also can go fishing or canoeing at Kentucky Lake or have picnics by the lakeshore. For more activities LBL offers, visit its websitewww.landbetweenthelakes.us.

Playhouse in the Park

Playhouse in the Park is Murray-Calloway County’s community-run theater in Murray’s Central Park. A show premieres at the beginning of each month and usually plays for two weeks with residents of the community as cast members. Tickets are from $8 – 10. “Little Women” will play from June 4 – 17 and “A Year With Frog and Toad Kids” will play from July 17 – 21 (tickets go on sale July 6 for the latter). Anyone can also audition if they have such aspirations. … Continue Reading

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