GPA requirement change does more good than harm

The staff editorial is the majority opinion of The Murray State News Editorial Board. Seniors graduating this December are in the final stretch, but there are proving to be a couple bumps in the road along the way. While the University has attempted to be transparent about these changes, students …

Feelin’ the MUSIC

Sigma Alpha Iota hosted the 57th annual All Campus Sing Wednesday Umbrellas, tarps and an estimated 1,000 spectators covered the Quad Wednesday to open the 57th annual All Campus Sing. The event began with an introduction to the judges and a featured guest, Judy Hill, member of Sigma Alpha Iota, who participated …

Women’s tennis still No. 1

Racers take on OVC Tournament in Nashville Saturday and Sunday For the second year in a row the Murray State women’s tennis team won the OVC regular season championship. This year they are co-champions with Eastern Kentucky. On April 11 the Racers (15-3, 9-1) faced Jacksonville State (9-14, 5-5) in …

Cum laude GPA requirements to change in fall

Students are disappointed in Murray State’s cum laude GPA requirement change from a 3.3 to a 3.4, but by decreasing the number of hours in residence and removing the upper level hours in residence will in turn help more students qualify for academic honors at graduation. Mark Rhodes, junior from …

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Geocaching: the world’s best game hidden in plain sight

April 21, 2015 News, Uncategorized

Zach Davies, contributing writer.

Geocaches are the best kept secrets hiding all around you. You’re constantly surrounded by them, often walking within feet of them. But then, how could you know?

Secret treasure isn’t supposed to be obvious.

If you’ve never heard of geocaching, here’s the rundown:

  1. Someone hides a small trinket (typically in an ink cartridge or tiny canister) somewhere that’s difficult for someone to accidentally find.
  2. The person marks the object’s coordinates publicly on the Geocaching service, usually with a short description and a hint.
  3. Other users try to track it down.
There's a well-hidden cache location somewhere in this picture, but where?

There’s a well-hidden cache location somewhere in this picture, but where?

If this is news to you, you’ve been missing the most fun new trend in years. Much like the spoils of a good geocache, the act of geocaching seems to be a hidden treasure itself.

Fifteen years ago, May 2, 2000 the U.S. government ended the “Selective Availability” of GPS systems, vastly expanding the accuracy of global positioning for civil and commercial use. A day later, Dave Ulmer, GPS enthusiast and father of geocaching, hid a container in the woods.

He posted the coordinates of the container online and asked anyone who found the container to “Take some stuff, leave some stuff.” And geocaching was born.

For more than a decade, users of geocaching.com played the game in nearly every city in America and across much of the world.

There are treasure hunters among you, whether you’re privy to it or not.

Caches can be hidden anywhere, and the more creative the spot the better: whether it’s magnetized under a fencepost, cradled high up in a tree, or buried under a hidden brick.

The tougher the cache is to find, the more rewarding it is to uncover.

This also prevents non-cachers, also known as “muggles” by the geocaching community, from taking the cache without knowing its purpose.

A standard geocache haul.

A standard geocache haul.

Once you’ve found a cache, crack it open and see what’s inside. Every cache contains a piece of paper for finders to sign and date and some caches contain even more treasures. It’s not unusual to find old toys, spare change or other oddities inside. The standard etiquette is to take something only if you put something back in, so don’t grab the goodies and run.

But when geocaching, make sure to follow the actual rules as well and confirm with any private property owners that they are okay with the cache being there. The rules are simple and minimal: if you take something from the geocache, leave something of equal or greater value for the next hunter. Write about your find in the cache logbook and then log your experience at geocaching.com

In the past, incidents like this one could have been easily prevented by referring to the geocaching rules. The biggest rule of Geocaching: don’t be dumb.

The thrill of exploration is what draws many Geocachers to the hobby.

Richie Deason, junior from Wingo, Ky., said geocaching is a great way to get out and find new places that users had no idea about.

“My buddy Trevor and I found an entire trail we never knew existed while we were looking for (a cache),” he said.

Deason said items hidden for geocaching are everywhere.

“My favorite place to go is Noble Park in Paducah,” he said. “It’s so nice, and there’s a bunch of them there.”

Each icon on this map shows a geogache hiding in Murray. It's hard to be anywhere in the city and not be surrounded by them.

Each icon on this map shows a geogache hiding in Murray. It’s hard to be anywhere in the city and not be surrounded by them.

There are about 30 geocaches registered in Murray and hundreds more within 30 miles of the city limits.

Eight months ago the United States reported being home to more than a million caches, according to the Geocache Fact Sheet.

Geocaching might not be mainstream, but it’s far from a tiny hobby. More than 6 million users are registered at geocaching.com, and that number grows larger each year.

Free geocaching apps are widely available for Iphones and Androids. Each of the official apps can be used as much as you’d like without paying, but paying for a premium membership ($10 for three months, $30 for a year) allows members to view extra caches that can’t be seen otherwise.

There are still more to find without ever having to pay a cent, and upgrading is just a bonus for those who want to find everything.

Requiring just a smartphone and a perceptive eye, Geocaching is an easily accessible diversion that beckons out the adventurer in us all.

When given a chance to turn the familiar world around you into a game, why wouldn’t you decide to play?

Apartment fire leaves one with minor injuries

April 21, 2015 News
Photo by Mary Bradley/The News.

Photo by Mary Bradley/The News.

One person suffered minor burn injuries from an apartment fire last night on Diuguid Drive.

Fire Chief Eric Pologruto said the person was transported to the local hospital by ambulance, but was later transferred to Vanderbilt Medical Center.

The cause of the fire at the four townhouse apartment complex was still under investigation by the City Fire Marshal last night, but was later determined this morning.

“The fire appears to have originated from a gas propane grill that one of the occupants was using,” Pologruto said.

He said it is unknown at this time whether an occupant was using the grill at the time of the fire or if it had been left on after being used.

… Continue Reading

‘It had taken over my life.’

April 17, 2015 News

How one traumatic night for a student became a six-month struggle with Murray State.

Editor’s Note: The Murray State News changed the name of the woman and decided to not name the alleged perpetrator or any other students involved.

It took Lily Smith two days to fully understand she had been raped.

She said as she stood in the shower thinking about the events of Nov. 7, 2014, she wished the hot water running over her head were acid, eating away flesh and memories.

“If I didn’t ask for this, then what does that make it? The shock of the word ‘rape’ hit me,” Smith said.

It took another three days for her to gather the courage to come forward about what happened. … Continue Reading

GPA requirement change does more good than harm

The staff editorial is the majority opinion of The Murray State News Editorial Board.

Katie Wilborn/The News

Katie Wilborn/The News

Seniors graduating this December are in the final stretch, but there are proving to be a couple bumps in the road along the way.

While the University has attempted to be transparent about these changes, students seem to be taken off guard and frustrated with the decision to raise the Cum laude GPA requirement from 3.3 to 3.4.

For some, frustration is an understatement.

The frustration stems from those who have been under the understanding that the requirement for graduating with Cum laude honors was 3.3 for so long that raising it to a 3.4 by fall 2015 seems unreasonable. … Continue Reading

The Murray State News – Education Abroad

April 17, 2015 Special Sections

Education Abroad is a special publication of The Murray State News.

Feelin’ the MUSIC

Sigma Alpha Iota hosted the 57th annual All Campus Sing Wednesday

IMG_3850_EDITUmbrellas, tarps and an estimated 1,000 spectators covered the Quad Wednesday to open the 57th annual All Campus Sing.

The event began with an introduction to the judges and a featured guest, Judy Hill, member of Sigma Alpha Iota, who participated in the first All Campus Sing.

Guests honored the flag when the Racer Men’s Choir sang the National Anthem and supported Murray State with the singing of the fight song led by the Murray State Football team.

Independent groups began the competition portion of the show with the Euclidean Math Club “bringing nerdy back.” The National Panhellenic Council performed songs in a performance titled, “Soul Train.”

Other performances included the International Student Organization who incorporated various flags from around the world as well as Sigma Alpha performing a “Sisters before Misters” act.

Residential colleges rocked the stage with a variety of acts ranging from romance in a Romeo and Juliet performance by White & Elizabeth Residential Colleges to a Clue mystery performed by Springer-Franklin College. Hester College entertained the crowd with a “Space Jam” tribute. Members danced in uniforms and sweatbands and sang around a large scoreboard and basketball goal. … Continue Reading

Women’s tennis still No. 1

Racers take on OVC Tournament in Nashville Saturday and Sunday

Kory Savage/The News POSITIVE ENDING: (Above, left) Junior Megan Blue from Mississauga, Ontario hits the ball during doubles play on Saturday April 11. Sophomore Verginie Tchakarova from Sofia, Bulgaria plays her last regular season game before her and twin, Eleonore transferring in the Fall.

POSITIVE ENDING: Junior Megan Blue from Mississauga, Ontario hits the ball during doubles play on Saturday April 11.

For the second year in a row the Murray State women’s tennis team won the OVC regular season championship. This year they are co-champions with Eastern Kentucky.

On April 11 the Racers (15-3, 9-1) faced Jacksonville State (9-14, 5-5) in the final match of the regular season. With the title on the line, the Racers played at the top of their game and won 7-0.

Before the match, senior Andrea Eskauriatza was honored by Head Coach Jorge Caetano as she prepared to play in her final match at the Bennie Purcell Tennis Courts.

“She did exactly what we expected her to do all year and that was win,” Caetano said. “She is always exciting to watch with the way she plays, sliding around and getting to the ball.”

The Racers jumped on their opponents early and scored the doubles point behind a strong effort from a new team of Nancy Karaky and Verginie Tchakarova who won 8-0. Verginie typically pairs with her twin sister Eleonore Tchakarova, but an injury kept Elenore from competing over the weekend. … Continue Reading

Miss MSU winner makes history

April 17, 2015 Features

Miss MSU judges crown Tanelle Smith as Murray State’s first black queen

Photo courtesy of Jeremiah Johnson Miss MSU winner, Tanelle Smith, sophomore from Cape Girardeau, Mo., poses with President Bob Davies after being crowned.

Photo courtesy of Jeremiah Johnson
Miss MSU winner, Tanelle Smith, sophomore from Cape Girardeau, Mo., poses with President Bob Davies after being crowned.

The “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” themed Miss Murray State University pageant took place Saturday in Lovett Auditorium as history was made by crowing the first black queen.

Emily Baker, junior from Russellville, Ky., was the marketing specialist for the pageant.

Her main goal was to increase student attendance and awareness of the pageant.

“One thing I always noticed about Miss MSU was the lack of student knowledge and interest in the event,” Baker said. “These girls work so hard preparing for this scholarship opportunity and they deserve to be supported by the students, staff and community … Through social media we were able to gain followers and interest from the student body.”

The audience was welcomed by Executive Director Laken Kanipe, junior from Clay, Ky.

  “I am excited for the audience to see the opening number,” Kanipe said before the show. “We’ve worked hard to make sure the show is really unique and entertaining for all.” … Continue Reading

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