Theater deems propriety overrated

Katherine Summerfield, freshman from Louisville, Ky., gets ready for opening night. || Kristen Allen

Katherine Summerfield, freshman from Louisville, Ky., gets ready for opening night. || Kristen Allen

When propriety gets in the way and truth is increasingly hard to discern, “She Stoops to Conquer” tells the story as secret relationships collide and ulterior motives come to light.

Set in a time when propriety is a constant obstacle, “She Stoops to Conquer” mocks the manners of its time.

“I like the play a lot simply because even though it is all about propriety and manners that can often make plays like this one difficult to understand, these are the very things the play is making fun of,” said Matthew Crider, director.

The play features the absurdity of restoration-time manners, heightening the contrasts between what characters say and what they truly meant.

“It’s just silly,” Crider said. “It’s making fun of the political correctness that can make it very difficult to get to know someone.”

As the play progresses, Tony Lumpkin, played by Salar Ardebili, junior from Tehran, Iran., finds himself in the middle of it all.

Lumpkin is the trouble of the play as he plays tricks, deceives and baffles the others.

Of no desire to marry, Lumpkin arranges those around him to his liking, finding amusement in their confusion at his hand as he watches his work come to fruition in a finish that will satisfy all audiences.

 

Staff Report