Falling fins fixed on Price Doyle Fine Arts Complex

Jenny Rohl/The News A construction worker at the Price Doyle Fine Arts Complex fixes the exterior fins that were finished this week.
Jenny Rohl/The News A construction worker at the Price Doyle Fine Arts Complex fixes the exterior fins that were finished this week.

Jenny Rohl/The News
A construction worker at the Price Doyle Fine Arts Complex fixes the exterior fins that were finished this week.

Untouched for nearly 40 years, the Price Doyle Fine Arts Building was renovated after pieces of the white, exterior fins of the building began to detach.

In an earlier email to The Murray State News, Kim Oatman, chief facilities officer of Facilities Management, said, “Although the fins are just for decoration and does not affect the structure of the building, construction had to be done to keep the fins from further falling off.”

When the University first discovered the fins were falling, straps were added to keep them in place. Safety precaution barricades were also erected around the building.

“The straps were only a temporary fix,” Oatman said. “The permanent fix was done with half inch thick stainless plates, 12 inches tall, which were molded to the contour of the fins. They were then bolted into place with four, half inch thick, anchors each.”

The exact cost for the fix are unknown at this point. The projected end date for the construction was Aug. 27.

He said construction has lasted a little longer than expected.

Some students claim that the noise from the construction is a distraction and that it causes them to lose concentration.

Madison Jarrett, sophomore from Paducah, Ky., said there is a lot of beeping during classes and the noises are worse for the classrooms that are right beside the construction.

He said sometimes professors have to stop talking to let the beeping and hammering noises stop so the students are able to hear what the professor is saying.

Even though the construction is a distraction, other students argue it is just in the way.

“Sometimes the workers would have different parts of the building blocked off, and (students) would have to walk around the building to get to the practice rooms,” said Lane Northcutt, junior from Frankfort, Ky.

Carly Dothsuk, freshman from Cadiz, Ky., said the shortcut she normally takes between the new and Old Fine Arts building to get from The Quad to the main walkway was blocked off during the construction.

Although it is not much farther of a walk, the pathway provides precious minutes when late for a class. However, with the construction near finished, University members

Now that a permanent solution has been made, the fences are down and professors and students will not have to worry about any more construction interruptions.

 

Story by Brittany Risko, Contributing writer